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Low Fire Friday - Raw materials needed for low fire glazes

Meagan Chaney Gumpert - Friday, April 05, 2013
If you were starting from scratch and needed to buy raw materials and chemicals for low fire glaze mixing, what would you need?

But wait, let me back up...

It started in January. My annual studio clean up. But this year, I did a seriously over-due, deep cleaning. Top to bottom - reorganized, threw away junk, recycled, sold unused equipment/supplies, and built a new glazing area. The new glazing area brings me to today's edition of Low Fire Friday. 

The inspiration for my glaze area over-haul came from Emily Murphy Pottery. Here's her space...


And here's my before and after...

It's a dream! Compulsively organized, just like I like it. All that cleaning up, throwing, away, and organizing all those chemicals got me thinking, which raw materials do I use most often? And what would qualify as "must-haves" so that I could mix all my favorite glazes. 

Without further ado, here's the grocery list I came up with


These materials and the quantities listed would give you enough to make one 500g batch (the size of a large yogurt container) of each of the following: My Favorite Crawl Glaze, Todd's Texture, Bleeding Cake, Lizard Skin, Base 3, Base 4,and Pete Pinnell's white slip. All of which were featured in a Low Fire Friday post.

The materials I listed above are definitely enough to get you started with a few low fire glazes. But if you're looking for more, I like to have the materials listed below readily available so that when I come across an irresistible glaze recipe, I have what I need to do the testing. The 50lbs of Red Art and XX Sagger are for terra sigillata. I buy most of my raw materials from Highwater Clays, so the prices quoted are from their website. 

Some other materials I have on hand are:



What about you? What raw materials do you use the most? What did I overlook? 

Thanks for checking in and happy glazing!






Comments
Tammy commented on 08-Apr-2013 10:52 AM
Thanks for posting the list of chemicals you feel would get a mixer off to a good start with glaze mixing. I am acquiring chemicals and equipment as I find they are necessary, and will soon have a nice base to build on.
As far as Emily Murph'y workspace, yes, it looks nice, and might be something to aspire to. There's a reason it looks so neat, organized, and desirable. SHE DOESN'T USE IT.
If you look at her blog, she hasn't posted since early December, 2012, and that post isn't about pots.
Her Etsy store remains empty, and has been for a year or two.
She never blogs about her pots in coming shows or exhibits, so what, exactly is she doing with all those chemicals, and that nice space? Nothing.
At least a messy work area that is being used to turn out pots or paintings. or weavings or sculptures is one that indicates artistic expression, life, growth.
A work area that is as neat as a pin is easy to achieve if you never use it.
I'd rather see blog posts, messy work areas, and pots, painting, sculpture,etc. any day, wouldn't you?
Keep at it, and best of luck!
Meagan Chaney Gumpert commented on 08-Apr-2013 03:36 PM
Hi Tammy,

Thanks for your comment. Best of luck setting up your studio and stocking your glazing area! What an exciting adventure.

Yes, a messy area is often the sign that creativity is taking place! Who has time to clean when inspiration strikes!

I follow Emily Murphy more of facebook, than through her blog.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151571204547122&set=a.404434852121.179930.233158042121&type=1&theater

From what I can tell, she was just glazing and unloading a kiln a week or so ago - with her 2 year old daughter attempting to "help." As the mother of two small children myself (2.5 yrs and 7 months), I personally find Emily's studio/life journey/struggle inspirational. It's helpful for me to see other artists/mothers who are trying to balance it all. And I'm guilty of ignoring my Etsy shop and blog from time to time too. Oops. Oh well, we all have the same 24 hours in a day. What can you do?

Thanks again for reading and following along with me! As always, I welcome suggestions and if you have any more questions, please don't hesitate to ask.
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